The quarrel between the ancients and moderns

(active from 2015)

Accademia Platonica, Mosaico di Pompei (I sec. a.C.)

The quarrel between Ancients and Moderns has its roots first in the Italian Renaissance, the in the debate that took place with the French Academy at the end of the 17th century. Our group strives to retrace these experiences, but also to reflect upon the 20th century rediscovery of ancient motives and interpretative solutions as opposed to the crisis of modern thought. By examining the works of relevant authors (mostly with Jewish origins) such as Leo Strauss, Eric Weil, Jacob Klein, Hannah Arendt, Karl Löwith and Hans Jonas, we intend to assess whether, what and to what extent Ancients still have to teach to contemporary philosophy.

Group Coordinators: dr. Fabio Fossa and dr. Anna Romani
Group Supervisors: Prof. Alfredo Ferrarin (Università di Pisa) e Prof. Alessandra Fussi (Università di Pisa)

P. P. Rubens, Los cuatro filósofos (1611-12)

Professors and researches who collaborate (or collaborated) with this research group:
Prof. Carlo Altini (Università di Modena-Reggio Emilia/Fondazione San Carlo di Modena)
Prof. Leonardo Amoroso (Università di Pisa)
Prof. Jeffrey Bernstein (College of Holy Cross)
Prof. Francesca Calabi (Università di Pavia)
Prof. Raimondo Cubeddu (Università di Pisa)
Prof. Cristina D’Ancona (Università di Pisa)
Prof. Nicolas de Warren (KU Leuven/Penn State University)
Prof. Adriano Fabris (Università di Pisa)
Dr. Roberto Franzini Tibaldeo (KU Leuven)
Prof. David Janssens (Tilburg University)
Prof. Burt Hopkins (Seattle University)
Prof. Heinrich Meier (München Universität)
Dr. Marco Menon (München Universität)
Prof. Stefano Perfetti (Università di Pisa)
Prof. David Roochnik (Boston University)
Prof. Maria Michela Sassi (Università di Pisa)
Prof. Emidio Spinelli (Università di Roma La Sapienza)
Dr. Philipp von Wussow (Goethe Universität Frankfurt)
Prof. Catherine Zuckert (University of Notre Dame – Indiana)

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